Stunning Brown Horse Breeds To Know


Holstein Horse Breed

Another very good German breed, suitable for both riding and driving, is the Holstein Horse, whose Andalusian origin (and oriental according to some believers) is supposed to date back to the 13th century. The horse was bred on very good pastures of alluvial origin on the right bank of the River Elbe, which was very suitable for providing a powerful animal, and in the 16th to 18th centuries this breed was in high esteem not only at home but also abroad, particularly for export to France. The breed fetched good prices and was exported in large numbers, but afterward, it deteriorated.

According to E. Iverson’s ‘Abstracts of Animal Breeding’, March 1939:

“From 1825 onwards a reorientation of breeding took place, particularly owing to the introduction of the Yorkshire Coach Horse. The resulting, compact conformation combined with a satisfactory gait proved successful, and increased demand for Holstein horses again caused a serious dearth of breeding of uniform quality. This led to the organization of breeders and of the central stud at Traventhal. Contrary to the usual policy in German ‘warm-blood’ breeding, the English Thoroughbred influence in Holstein is negligible, but half-bred stallions contributed to the present excellence of the blood.”

Usually of brown coloring, the Holstein horse is a very fine, strong animal, with good legs, free action, endurance, and gait, and his conformation is different from that of other German ‘warm-blood’ horses. Although of slow growth he enjoys now a very good reputation as a light-draught hunter and even steeplechaser. Just before the Second World War, there was a great demand for the Holstein in South America and other countries, while in Germany he was mostly used as an artillery horse.

As with the Hanoverian, the Holstein was always a popular horse and one that was found in great numbers, but like all ride-and-drive horses, the breed has suffered more seriously than the true riding horse as the result of mechanization. As has been pointed out, it has a resemblance to the Hanoverian and is seen at times as a very handsome horse, although others have not attained a very high standard of looks. The Traventhal Stud was disbanded in 1961.

Holstein Horse Breed

Another very good German breed, suitable for both riding and driving, is the Holstein Horse, whose Andalusian origin (and oriental according to some believers) is supposed to date back to the 13th century. The horse was bred on very good pastures of alluvial origin on the right bank of the River Elbe, which was very suitable for providing a powerful animal, and in the 16th to 18th centuries this breed was in high esteem not only at home but also abroad, particularly for export to France. The breed fetched good prices and was exported in large numbers, but afterward, it deteriorated.

According to E. Iverson’s ‘Abstracts of Animal Breeding’, March 1939:

“From 1825 onwards a reorientation of breeding took place, particularly owing to the introduction of the Yorkshire Coach Horse. The resulting, compact conformation combined with a satisfactory gait proved successful, and an increased demand for Holstein horses again caused a serious dearth of breeding of uniform quality. This led to the organisation of breeders and of the central stud at Traventhal. Contrary to the usual policy in German ‘warm-blood’ breeding, the English Thoroughbred influence in Holstein is negligible, but half-bred stallions contributed to the present excellence of the blood.”

Usually of brown coloring, the Holstein horse is a very fine, strong animal, with good legs, free action, endurance, and gait, and his conformation is different from that of other German ‘warm-blood’ horses. Although of slow growth he enjoys now a very good reputation as a light-draught hunter and even steeplechaser. Just before the Second World War, there was a great demand for the Holstein in South America and other countries, while in Germany he was mostly used as an artillery horse.

As with the Hanoverian, the Holstein was always a popular horse and one that was found in great numbers, but like all ride-and-drive horses, the breed has suffered more seriously than the true riding horse as the result of mechanization. As has been pointed out, it has a resemblance to the Hanoverian and is seen at times as a very handsome horse, although others have not attained a very high standard of looks. The Traventhal Stud was disbanded in 1961.

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